12.07.19

Proudest Moments from our Support Workers

Hearth Support Workers
Hearth Support Workers. Charlotte Malina and Ashleigh Hanna. Photography Credit, Temena Riordan.

By Liv Gorman

The relationship between Hearth Support Workers and Participants is a very special one. Support work is more than providing support to someone who needs it. Quality support is found on mutual respect and a trusted, genuine connection between people.

At Hearth, Support Workers and Participants are matched in terms of their geography, personality and skills. Rather than providing a blanket solution to support, Hearth realises all Participant needs are different, including their situations and support networks. In the same way we are all unique, Hearth aims to individualise every aspect of support possible.  

What differentiates support work at Hearth is a goal-oriented approach around driving individual levels of Participant independence. Goal setting is powerful because it provides Participants and Support Workers a platform to set and develop goals and track their progress.

While Support Work is always rewarding, it can also be tough. Particularly when Support Workers and Participant families aren’t seeing visible progress. While a goal-centered approach to support work is not mandatory, it is clearly valued by Hearth Support Workers and families. In a recent survey, Support Workers were asked to share their proudest moments whilst working at Hearth.

62% of Hearth Support Workers detailed their joy in seeing and partaking in each Participant’s progress. Their responses focused on tackling goals, working towards independent activities and implementing their own teachings. Each response was anecdotal, considered and imitated their joy in experiencing these moments with Participants.

Support Workers also commented on an appreciation for their working relationships at Hearth. These Support Workers cherished seeing their Participants happy in themselves and the level of support received themselves. There was a focus on connections formed with Participants, their families and Hearth Relationship Managers who often act as a sounding board for Support Workers.

A number of Hearth Support Workers associated their proudest moment with personal growth and career development. These Support Workers emphasised their own learnings from Participants, their families and the impact support work has had on their lives.

Hearth Support Workers are a prime example of how perseverance and a commitment to support work pays off.